Practical Farmers of Iowa Field Day at the Rosmann Family Farm in Harlan

Practical Farmers of Iowa Field Day at the Rosmann Family Farm in Harlan

I am looking forward to catching up with Resilient Agriculture farmers Ron and Maria Rosmann in just a few weeks.  Ron and Maria have invited me to open the field day by sharing some of the lessons I’ve learned from sustainable farmers and ranchers about how to cultivate climate resilience with sustainable and organic agriculture.  

I will share three simple lessons to help frame the field day events:

  1. Resilience is about more than bouncing back!  It is about design and management of systems to cultivate the capacity to avoid or reduce damage from disturbance.
  2. Resilience has regional roots!  What I mean by this is that “it takes a region to raise a resilient farm.”  We need each other – the producers and the eaters – to cultivate resilience.  No one farm can do it alone!

We already know enough to put us on the path to a resilient food future!  The Rosmann family, and many others like them all across the country, have been busy for the last 30 years bringing the future into being. This farm, and many others like it all across our country ARE THE FUTURE of food.  We don’t need any more research, any more studies, any new technologies – the future is already right here – you are standing in it.

Working Lands Offer Climate Solutions, No Matter Location

Working Lands Offer Climate Solutions, No Matter Location

“LOS ANGELES — Mayor Eric Garcetti announced Thursday the appointment of Los Angeles’ first forest officer, a position that will oversee urban forests in an effort to plant 90,000 trees by 2021.

“Every tree we plant can help stem the tide of the climate crisis, and when we expand our urban forest, we can sow the seeds of a healthier, more sustainable future for communities across our city,” Garcetti said.

The mayor appointed Rachel Malarich, a certified arborist, to the post.

According to the mayor’s office, Malarich has spent more than 12 years working to increase tree canopy in urban areas throughout Southern California, devising strategic management plans to expand urban forests and promoting community engagement.”

Read the rest of the article here!

Pasture-Raised Beef is a Climate Change Solution

Pasture-Raised Beef is a Climate Change Solution

“Will Harris is many things to many people. To chefs and foodies, he is a legendary farmer producing some of the world’s best pasture-raised meats infused with the terroir of South Georgia. To athletes, body-hackers, and health-conscious consumers, he is the owner of White Oak Pastures, which ships humanely-raised, non-GMO, grassfed proteins to their doorsteps. To the communities surrounding Bluffton, Georgia, he is one of the last good ole’ boys and the largest private employer in the county. To his colleagues in agriculture, he’s a renegade and an inspiration. But Will Harris’ legacy might turn out to be something else entirely. He may be remembered as the cattleman who figured out how to enlist cows in future generations’ struggle to reverse climate change.

Industrial-Sized Cow Farts

Almost everyone these days has been educated that carbon emissions from industrialized beef production are a startlingly large contributor to man-made climate change. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimates that livestock is already responsible for at least 14.5% of greenhouse gases being released worldwide.[1] FAO also estimates that global beef consumption will exponentially grow until it reaches 105 million metric tons before 2050.[2] Statistics on how bad beef consumption is for the environment are so ubiquitous that it is almost unthinkable for many climate scientists to advocate for anything but a vegetarian diet. Luckily for meat-eaters, scientists at Quantis, one of the world’s most respected environmental research and design firms, were not convinced that was the full story.”

Read the rest of the article here!

Bouncing Forward or Bouncing Back?  A Look at Resilient Options for Response to Midwest Flooding

Bouncing Forward or Bouncing Back? A Look at Resilient Options for Response to Midwest Flooding

Looking forward to spending time with Michelle Miller and company at the Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems next week to discuss how resilience thinking might help us envision bouncing forward from the Midwest flooding rather than simply bouncing back! 

Find out more information about the event here!

The Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems (CIAS) is is a research center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. The goal of our work at CIAS is to learn how particular integrated farming systems can contribute to environmental, economic, social, and intergenerational sustainability.

 

Celebrating Earth Day With Resilient Agriculture Grower Jim Koan

Celebrating Earth Day With Resilient Agriculture Grower Jim Koan

Had a great visit with Resilient Agriculture grower Jim Koan of Almar Farm and Orchards in Flushing MI this past weekend. Jim says that weather challenges have grown more frequent and more extreme since 2013. His decision to move to producing cider and other processed apple products continues to serve him well. Jim has expanded his line of JK Scrumpy’s organic ciders and offers many other apple-based products, including a drinking vinegar (made with Jim’s apple cider vinegar) called switchel. Switchel is an old-fashioned “energy drink”, which has been served to generations of hard-working field hands to give them a boost of energy and to help them rehydrate in the hot summer sun. Yum! Thanks for a great visit Jim!

Check out their farm and some amazing products here

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